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Treatments

Refractive surgery with intraocular lenses

cirugia refractiva con lente intraocular
Custom-made lenses, which may or may not replace the eye's natural lens.
New, increasingly improved models, which we place at your disposal.
A safe and effective alternative to glasses, contact lenses and laser techniques.

¿Qué es la cirugía refractiva con lentes intraoculares?

ntraocular lens implantation is a procedure that has been growing in recent years for the surgical correction of refractive errors. In fact, new models are constantly appearing, which we offer as forerunners with all guarantees for our patients, once their good results have been shown in clinical studies, which we participate in at the Miranza clinics.

There are different types of lenses we can implant and which, depending on their location in the eye, we can classify into:

  • Pseudophakic lenses: They replace the crystalline lens, i.e. the eye’s natural lens, when it stops focusing correctly due to age. This type of lens is also used in cataract surgery.
  • Phakic lenses: We place them between the cornea and the crystalline lens; thus, as they do not replace any eye structure, they are a reversible procedure. They are usually indicated for younger patients.

Moreover, depending on the focus provided by these lenses, we can also talk about:

  • Monofocal lenses: optimised for near or far vision.
  • Multifocal lenses: allow you to see well both near and far.
  • Extended-focus lenses: They have appeared more recently and increase the depth of focus compared to monofocal lenses, while avoiding some of the disadvantages that can be associated with multifocal lenses (such as halos, glare or loss of contrast).

Technological progress has not only allowed the introduction of new lens designs, but also more accurate equipment to calculate their power in each case and intelligent platforms in the operating room that allow their perfect positioning in the eye.

Problemas de visión que trata la cirugía refractiva con lentes intraoculares

Refractive surgery with intraocular lenses is an effective and safe alternative to the use of glasses or contact lenses, which you can choose if you have high levels of myopia, hyperopia and/or astigmatism or, for other reasons (such as a fragile cornea), it is preferable for us to perform this technique instead of laser refractive surgery.

On the other hand, if we implant a pseudophakic intraocular lens, especially common in cases of presbyopia or “eyestrain”, we will correct this refractive error and prevent you from developing cataracts in the future (link), as we will have already replaced the lens, which, in addition to losing its ability to focus, also becomes opaque over the years.

Since the characteristics of each eye and the visual needs of each person are different, we recommend that you see an ophthalmologist you trust, who will advise you on the technique and type of lens best suited to you.  A good preliminary diagnostic study and an accurate surgical indication are the first steps towards successful surgery.

Refractive surgery with intraocular lenses is an outpatient procedure we usually perform under topical anaesthesia (drops) and that does not take more than 15 to 20 minutes. We will usually operate on one eye first and, a few days later, on the other to ensure your good progress. You will soon notice that your vision has recovered and be able to resume your daily activities, except for some basic eye care and precautions your ophthalmologist will indicate, such as avoiding impacts or sudden efforts during the first weeks, performing good hygiene and complying with the indicated antibiotic and anti-inflammatory treatment.

Once you wear your custom-made intraocular lenses, you will see that they are completely unnoticeable.

Refractive surgery with intraocular lenses is no more complex than that performed with laser techniques, although some people are reluctant to have a “foreign body” implanted in the eye. You should know that these lenses are biocompatible, highly flexible and do not cause rejection or leave a foreign body sensation in the eye. Furthermore, we insert them through minimal incisions that heal quickly and do not require sutures. Except for exceptional cases, they do not move from the place we have implanted them nor do they require changing after a while.

Other possible complications, such as increased intraocular pressure or infection, are very rare. As to the possible associated side effects, such as visual disturbances especially at night, we can minimise them by selecting the type of lens that is best suited in each case.